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One of the biggest threats that computer users are facing today is the probability of a virus invasion. It is possible that your own PC might have been infected with a virus that you have downloaded unknowingly from the internet, or copied from other removable storage Medias like floppies or compact discs. While some viruses are capable of doing extensive damage to your system, some may be completely harmless but simply annoying. Whatever the problem is, its always best to t...

Removing Viruses From Your Computer

Removing Viruses From Your ComputerOne of the biggest threats that computer users are facing today is the probability of a virus invasion. It is possible that your own PC might have been infected with a virus that you have downloaded unknowingly from the internet, or copied from other removable storage Medias like floppies or compact discs. While some viruses are capable of doing extensive damage to your system, some may be completely harmless but simply annoying. Whatever the problem is, its always best to try and remove these malicious applications (manually or using anti-virus software) before they can cause any harm, and without deleting sensitive and important files on your computer.There is no one set of instructions you can follow to deal with a computer virus because all viruses are different. There may be variants but each variant may behave differently and independently. The steps mentioned here are general remedies that may be used if ever your system is infected with a virus.Active and inactive viruses:A virus is usually located in a file, and it can be in one of these two states: active and inactive. When the infected file has not been executed, the virus is in an inactive state, and is not necessarily harmful. In such cases it is enough to delete the file. When the infected file begins execution (when started by user, by operating system, or by another program), the virus changes its state from inactive to active, and begins to perform harmful activities on the system.Identify the virus:There is a webpage for every virus that has ever been identified by anti-virus companies, that explains how the virus executes itself, and usually how to remove it and disinfect the system. Heres one useful resource available for identifying viruses on your computer:The Symantec Antivirus Research Center Online Encyclopedia or the McAfee Virus Information Search Center (http://www.symantec.com/avcenter/vinfodb.html): Try using these virus search engines to locate information about the virus on your computer. The Symantec search is capable of identifying viruses according to the symptom experienced by the system (such as the subject line of the email message that contained the virus or the error message the virus causes on the computer), but its best if you know the name of the virus beforehand. Also remember that different computer viruses produce different "symptoms".Using Anti-virus Software:Once the virus has been identified, the best thing to do next is to run an anti-virus software, scan and clean the system. If you have anti-virus software on your computer (most users do), make sure the software is up-to-date.Most anti-virus software run periodical, scheduled or manual scans on your computer according to preference, and if fully updated, will promptly identify any malicious activity or files on your system. You then have the options of deleting, quarantining or analyzing the virus depending on the type of antivirus you employ. If youre not too acquainted with the software, the only recommendation is to immediately delete the file, thereby eliminating any threat posed to your systems security.Protect yourself from future threats:Once you have removed the virus(es), it would be a good time to make sure your computer is protected from future threats by following these simple steps:1.Make sure the anti-virus software on your computer is always up-to-date2.Run real-time protection if your anti-virus has the feature (most anti-virus software do)3.Do not download or run any suspicious or unrecognized email attachments or file from the internet4.Always run your anti-virus and scan any removable storage Medias before using themContact technical support:If you cant solve the problem yourself, you should contact technical support immediately by phone or email. Every anti-virus company has one. They will be able to help and guide you. Do not take any drastic steps, like formatting any of your drives, if you dont have prior experience.

T-Mobile Sidekick: The Cool Gizmo Youll Love To Own

T-Mobile Sidekick: The Cool Gizmo Youll Love To Own

The T-Mobile Sidekick II, the successor of the famed T-Mobile Sidekick, can be called the ultimate communication gadget. Launched in the US market by leading telephone carrier T-Mobile, the Sidekick II is not only helps you communicate, but has some great features that allow you to have a great time communicating! The T-Mobile Sidekick II has been launched after ironing out some of the problems that plagued the earlier version. Heres some vital statistics. The Sidekick II is fully loaded and weighs 6.49 ounces. It measures 5.12 x 2.60 x 0.87 inches and comes with a lithium-ion battery that provides up to 4.5 hours of digital talk time and 60 hours of digital standby time. Sidekick Ii runs on the GSM/GPRS 900/1800/1900 frequencies and has a one year limited warranty. Enough of what the T-Mobile Sidekick IIs great features. Let us see why it provides real bang for the buck and has reviewers drooling over it. The Sidekick II has got some huge improvements over the T-Mobile Sidekick I. The Sidekick II is a tri-band world phone. Flip it open and youll be greeted by the big color screen. You can send unlimited emails and the new keyboard is really easy to use. The T-Mobile Sidekick I suffered from a lack of buttons for easy access to basic functions. Not anymore. Dual purpose buttons make it easier to place calls and browse the Net using Sidekick II. You dont need to search the Settings menu to change the volume or adjust any other details. Youve got external buttons for that and also to turn the handset on or off. T-Mobile Sidekick II also has an external directional pad thats a great help if you are one of those avid gamers. The keyboard can be used for all text messaging, emailing, and calendar updates. The 240 x 160 pixels screen on the T-Mobile Sidekick II can support 65,000 colors. The Sidekick II is around 25 per cent thinner that the Sidekick I. It also gives you a comfortable feel when you are using it as a phone. The integrated camera, LED flash unit and self-portrait mirror are on the back of the handset. The T-Mobile Sidekick II comes loaded with the Hiptop OS and the handset has a 48 MB internal memory. Did you run out of memory storing those phone numbers? The phone book of the Sidekick II can accommodate 2000 contacts and multiple entries per contact. You also get the usual menu of recently missed, received, and dialed calls. Youve got polyphonic ring tones with 16 chords. If you need more you can download some great ring tones from T-Mobiles t-zones service. You can also assign a picture and ring tone to each caller. Well, the t-zones service can be used to download some great games too. Okay, heres one more reason you would love to own a Sidekick. T-Mobile has priced it fairly and you can get a Sidekick data plan ($29.99 per month) to use Sidekick IIs e-mail, messaging, and browser functions. Well, that is not the end of the good news though. Another Sidekick avatar is around the corner. T-Mobile Sidekick III will be launching Christmas!

Wireless Internet Terminology - Confusion Or Clarity?

Wireless Internet Terminology - Confusion Or Clarity?

Wireless Internet Terminology, like many things in life, especially those that have anything to do with computers is filled with terminology. But like most things, once you learn a few of the basic terms, understanding will come quickly. So don't be confused get informed and to help clarify, I've put together a basic wireless "internet-to-english" guide to help you along. IEEE - The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers The IEEE is in charge of the wireless networking standard, as well as many other computer-related standards - including the Ethernet standard. They ensure that computer equipment made by different manufacturers can work together. PCMCIA - Personal Computer Memory Card International Association Simply another standard for how to plug credit card size devices into a laptop computer to boost it's capabilities. It's been suggested by some that it should stand for "People Can't Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms". PCMCIA is a great way of adding wireless networking to your laptop as easily as inserting a disk. PCI - Peripheral Component Interconnect Used to install devices like graphics cards and network devices inside your computer. You would be using a PCI, if you wanted to install a wireless card inside your computer. 802.11 Set by the IEEE, it's the current wireless networking standard. It helps ensure that wireless devices can communicate with one another or in other words - they are interoperable. Interoperable Simply means that two different pieces of equipment have the ability to speak to each other or another way to put it - they are compatible. They can use them together because they were designed using the same standards. Because of the IEEE and the principle of interoperability, all wireless equipment you purchase should be compatible. Driver Not a piece of golf equipment but computer software that informs a computer how to talk to devices that plug into it. Most wireless networking drivers come on a CD-ROM. You then download the drivers from the CD onto your computer. Ethernet Currently, the most common way of connecting to a LAN or Local Area Network. Most wires connected to your computer today are ethernet and if you have a cable internet connection an ethernet wire is in all likely-hood, what is being used to connect to your modem. USB - Universal Serial Bus A port used for connecting all sorts of devices to a computer, including keyboards, a mouse, printers, external hard-drives and basically anything else you can think of. If you don't have a laptop or want to open up your computer you can get a USB wireless device. WEP - Wired Equivalent Privacy No longer used because in 2001 it was found to have security issues. As a result, it is now the old standard for encrypting wireless networks. WPA - WiFi Protected Access The new standard for encrypting wireless networks. An upgrade of WEP to fix security issues. To avoid becoming vulnerable, a WPA encrypted network changes encryption methods often. In addition, if an attack is detected, it has the ability to shut itself down for thirty seconds. PAN - Personal Area Network A network of devices connected together in one small area. A simple example of a PAN would be your computer, USB keyboard and mouse. Using a technology called Bluetooth, a PAN can be wireless. LAN - Local Area Network Briefly mentioned above, LAN is a computer network that... generally speaking is confined to one building, such as a home or office. A wireless LAN is also known as a WLAN. MAN - Metropolitan Area Network A network that covers a larger area, like a city or town. They are expensive but a wireless MAN has the capacity to spread Internet access across a wide area. Many college universities set-up a MAN to connect the entire campus. WAN - Wide Area Network A network that covers or connects to more than one physical site. A simple example would be a business that has locations in different cities, states or countries and they need them each location connected on the same network. The Internet itself is a WAN... the biggest WAN in the world. Mbps - Megabits Per Second Not to be confused with MBps, megabytes per second. Mbps is measurement of connection speed. There are eight megabits in a megabyte. GHz - Gigahertz One gigahertz is one billion cycles per second... it's a measurement of frequency. If the term sounds familiar it's probably because it's also used to measure the processing speed of the CPU on your computer, which is also measured in gigahertz. Linux A popular and growing alternative operating system to Windows. Linux is a less bulky, more efficient operating system in many ways than Windows and not to mention - it's free. Many servers run Linux for this reason. Computers running Linux can run many programs and connect to the Internet without needing Windows. Many wireless devices run Linux or are compatible with it.

Used Computers are by far the cheapest solution

Used Computers are by far the cheapest solution

Cheap computers are everywhere. Dell is offering some stupidly priced computer hardware at the moment, all with a view to beating the online shopping market. The point is, this isn't really conducive with an ethical, environmentally friendly solution and is simply keeping Dell gainfully employed.Low cost computers can also mean second hand and there's a few good reasons to buying used.1) The processing power of a used computer may not be much less than that currently on offer by the Manufacturer2) You don't need the latest and fastest computer to produce a spreadsheet, surf the web, write emails and write letters.3) A used computer has been road-tested. It's not going to fail on you any time soon.There's other reasons to get a used computer, but basically, that second hand unit you've been looking at will probably do most of the things you need your IT hardware to fulfill. Even the monitor doesn't have to be new. You may think that a brand new flat screen TFT is best with lower energy consumption and a small footprint, leaving loads of desk space. A flast screen monitor may be a great solution for some, but a used CRT screen is better for gaming, graphic design and photography. They're a proven and refined technology. They offer multisync solutions, allowing you to change resolutions and refresh rates on the fly, with every resolution being native (TFTs have one native refresh rate and the rest are emulated).A CRT is pretty much as good as a TFT when it comes to energy efficiency. There's only a few watts in it and as long as you turn everything off at the mains once done each day, you won't see a marked increase in your electrical bill. A naturally flat CRT screen will give you the added benefit of super fast refresh rates and be able to keep up with the latest games on the market- all at a very low cost.Cheap used laptops do however have some downsides. These include the battery life and general wear and tear of the unit from it's previous owner. Saying all that, as long as it's been relatively well looked after, it'll give you a great solution for emails and writing on the move. Not only that, but if it's stolen, you won't have lost as much money.

How To Troubleshoot Your Computer's Video Display

Copyright 2006 Otis CooperTroubleshoot Video CardsWhen you have problems with your video display,it can be something as simple as having the brightness turned down to a bad controller on the motherboard.If you have not done,first learn to identify the components of the video display system.When you look inside any open computer,see if you can locate the Video Card.Is your video card mounted in an adapter slot or is it integrated onto the motherboard.If the card is motherboard integrated,locate the jumpers that will allow the card to be disabled should you need to install another card.The Monitor is the second component in the video display and it must be compatible with your video card.Be sure the maximumn resolution of your video card and monitor are the same.Its even better to your a higher resolution display on your monitor.Go to http://www.ultimatepcrepair.com/photos.html to see a video card in an adapter slot and one that is motherboard mounted. Follow these procedures to correct any type of video display malfunction.NOTHING ON THE MONITORAs we first mentioned,chack the brightness and contrast buttons on the monitor to be sure they are not turned down. Yea,we know.This sounds a little silly to think this could be overlokked,but believe me,it really does.And while we're talking about simple checks,be sure the monitor is receiving power.If the power indicator light is out,remove the power cable and look for any bent or broken pins or connectors.Try to reboot the computer one or two times to be sure the system did not just lock up.If nothing happens,replace the cable with a known good cable to prove that the wall outlet or surge protector has power.If the monitor has power but nothing is on the screen, check the data cable going into the rear of the computer. Be sure the cable is secure.If it is,Turn the power off to the system unit,remove the cable and look for broken, loose,or bent pins.Finally,if you're blessed enough to have two computers, exchange the monitor with a good monitor to see if it works.Replace the old monitor if the new monitor works. If the new monitor fail as well,remove the system cover to inspect the Video Card.MONITOR WORKS BUT NO DISPLAYWhen the Monitor is known to be good but its screen is still blank,the Video Card is the most likely culprit.First inspect the card to be sure it is fullly seated in its slot if it is adapter slot mounted.Check the jumpers of any motherboard mounted card to be sure a jumper has not been lost or loose.If you have been inside your system,its always a possibility to have moved the card.MONITOR WORKS BUT POOR DISPLAYIf your monitor works but the images appear fuzzy,or flickering often,and the text are hard to read,it may be time to adjust the video card's resolution and the refresh rate.Right click the desktop,select properties and open the display properties dialog box.Choose the tab for settings and adjust the slider to change your display resolution.Most 17-inch monitors will have a resolution of 800 x 600 but choose the best resolution for your eyes.After adjusting the resolution,check the display to see if all flickering and other problems have vanished. If not,optimize the refresh rate.The refresh rate is the rate in which the video card redraws the screen.Lower refresh rates sometimes cause flickering.To adjust this rate,open the display properties dialog box in the desktop, and choose the settings tab once again.Click the advanced button and choose the adapter tab if your operating system is Windows 98.If you have Windows XP,choose the Monitor tab.And from there you can set the refresh rate to about 70Hz or 70 Hertz.Check your monitor's manual or web site to see the maximum refresh rate for your monitor.To effectively maintain your video display,visit the supporting web sites for updated software patches and device drivers.Watch for new control software for your card that will greatly boost its performance.Take the time to clean the system unit case which will allow air to flow freely.This in turn will help keep the video components cool which will allow the card the perform smoothly.Rush over to www.ultimatepcrepair.com/photos.html and study the video components.Then open your PC ,locate the video card,and know if it is motherboard mounted or not.To learn much more in great detail, get the PC Super Pack with detailed video all about the video display system.

Computer Speakers - which ones?

Few people think too long and hard about their computer speakers, instead preferring to just use the ones that came with their computers. These speakers are often built-in and poor quality, especially on laptop systems, and do not do justice to the very good sound quality that most computers are capable of producing.The price range in computer speakers is even greater than that in other electronic products you can pay anywhere from the price of a pair of headphones to as much as the computer itself cost you. It is natural, therefore, to be unsure of exactly what your money is getting you, which is where this article can hopefully be of some help.Perhaps the most important thing you should look for when choosing your speakers is their maximum output power, which is measured in watts. This number tells you how good the speakers will sound at different volumes while almost all speakers can sound good at low volumes, only ones with very high maximum output power will sound good at higher volumes. The higher the volume you plan to use, the more power you need.Another important consideration is whether the speakers can produce either 5-speaker or 7-speaker surround sound, which makes a big difference over traditional 2-speaker systems. You should also check whether the speakers come with a subwoofer, which is a special loudspeaker for bass, allowing you to better hear the beat of your music. However, many people actually consider subwoofers undesirable, as they are so large and dont always fit in well with a computer setup.It is only really worth splashing out on speakers if you often use your computer for gaming or for playing music. If you do, then you might consider that theres nothing to say so-called computer speakers are only for computers with a little imaginative wiring, you can also hook them up to televisions, games consoles, mp3 players, and all sorts of other things besides. This works in reverse, too, so if you already have a good pair of speakers, it should be relatively simple to connect them up to your computer and get some very good sound that way.

Summary

One of the biggest threats that computer users are facing today is the probability of a virus invasion. It is possible that your own PC might have been infected with a virus that you have downloaded unknowingly from the internet, or copied from other removable storage Medias like floppies or compact discs. While some viruses are capable of doing extensive damage to your system, some may be completely harmless but simply annoying. Whatever the problem is, its always best to t...